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Monthly Archives

June 2009

Heat, Anger & Appetite

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Police staff have known for decades that aggression-based (violent) crimes increase dramatically in the hot summer months. The burning question is this: Why? Are summer months more stressful than the period of snow covered skies? The answer seems to be related to a small, but very important part of the brain called the hypothalamus. As ambient temperatures increase (causing fluctuations in body temperature) so to do tempers—sometimes violently (pay attention to the news, but more importantly, pay attention to your own emotional thermometer). It has also been noticed that people’s appetites tend to wane during the hot summer months and guess what part of your brain controls appetite? That’s right! The Hypothalamus. This small part of your brain controls both body temperature and appetite. But wait… there’s more: the Hypothalamus is also called the seat of the emotions for its role associated (in conjunction with the amygdala) with stress (specifically anger). The expression, “Chill out” takes on a whole new meaning with this knowledge. If there is a Bermuda Triangle brewing a perfect storm of stress, it’s the hypothalamus! The good news is that meditation seems to keep this part of the brain in check (balance), but you have to meditate regularly, you cannot just wish it.

• Stress Tip for the Day:
Since the advent of air conditioning and its proliferation in the American society, we have seen a corresponding increase in obesity (a correlation you don’t hear about on the news!) Here is the connection. Restaurants know that people eat more when the temperature inside is cool so they often set the room temperature a bit lower than normal to help customers eat more food (more than they might otherwise!) Have you ever noticed this when eating out? Sneaky, huh? So consider choosing healthy restaurants that have outdoor seating and chose to sit outdoors (this way you are likely only to eat what you body needs and not pack on the calories to satisfy the temporary thermometer adjustments of the hypothalamus!).

• Links Worth Noting:
I just returned from the ISSSEEM (Subtle Energies and Energy Medicine Conference in Boulder, CO (where, by the way, the hotel conference center was more than cool. One lady I swear was suffering from hypothermia. Lynne McTaggert was one of the keynote speakers (Lynne had written the best seller, The Field and The Intention Experiment. She mentioned a few websites that I thought were worth checking out and so I wanted to pass them along to you (great conference by the way):
http://www.livingthefield.com/
http://www.theintentionexperiment.com/
http://www.thelivingmatrixmovie.com/lynne-mcTaggart

• Photo of the Day:
After many wonderful weeks of cool wet, spring weather here in Colorado, temps hit the low 90’s today and are expected to remain so all week (ergo the inspiration for today’s blog). To balance things out, I decided to highlight a photo of the cool Caribbean waters of the Bahamas (from 40,000 feet above while flying to the island of St. Lucia). Enjoy!

• Quote for the Day:
“Gravity is not responsible for people falling in love.”
—Albert Einstein

Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D. is an internationally renowned expert in the fields of stress management, mind-body-spirit healing and stress and human spirituality. He is the author of over 10 books including the bestsellers, Stand Like Mountain, Flow Like Water, Stressed Is Desserts Spelled Backward, The Art of Calm, Quiet Mind, Fearless Heart and Managing Stress (6E). He can be reached through his website:www.brianlukeseaward.net

© Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D.

Go for the Peak Experience!

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Not all stress is bad! Experts in the field of stress management often refer to Eustress as “The good stress.” Eustress (the prefix “eu” means pleasant or good, like that found in the words euphoria, even Eurhythmics, etc.) is any kind of experience that we find to be uplifting, euphoric or exhilarating! Renowned psychologist, Abraham Maslow called these moments “Peak experiences” and he encouraged us to have many of them. Sadly, under the often perceived “black cloud” of chronic distress, many people never hit their quota in a lifetime! Curiously, it seems initially that your body responds the same way to good stress or bad stress with an increase in heart rate, blood pressure etc. But what good stress has over distress is the release of neuropeptides (e.g. beta-endorphin) that not only make you feel good, its very likely that they help boost the immune system and work to keep your body on an even kneel. Hans Selye, the father of stress management once said, “I cannot and should not be cured of my stress, but merely taught to enjoy it. Some would argue that Hans was learning to place the focus on Eustress! Is it really possible to be too happy these days these days (without pharmaceutics or other ingested help)? Balance is the key!

• Stress Tip for the Day:
What makes you REALLY happy? Happiness is one part attitude, one part mystery and two parts effort to bring things that make you happy happen. Make a list of 10 things that make you want to reach your arms up in the air and say, “it doesn’t get any better than this!” Having a list is good, but it’s just a start. Pick one thing on your list and DO IT!

• Books Worth Noting:
My dentist often recommends book while he checking out my teeth during my office visits. Stan has an extensive library (and good taste too, I might add). One day last year he recommended the book, Collapse, by Jared Diamond (the author of Guns, Germs and Steel). I finally picked the book up a few weeks ago and just finished it yesterday. An amazing foray of how and why civilizations collapse. Coincidently, the latest issues of the National Geographic has a story on the collapse of the civilization known as Angkor Wat in Cambodia. Given our current situation these days with oil, energy and the perfect storm of various factors, a little history helps put things in perspective and even offers insights toward our (potential) future(s). Enjoy.

• Photo of the Day:
Colorado has no shortage of “peak experiences.” In fact, Colorado has 54 mountains over 14,000 feet, making it the state with the highest number of peaks in the lower 48. Standing on the top of any of these peaks is the epitome of eustress! This view was taken from one of these peaks, called Mt. Evans, one of the few mountains where you can drive to the top (wink) and also one of the few mountains in Colorado where there are Mountain Goats wandering about.

• Quote for the Day:
“You are perfect. The only time you are not perfect is when you compare yourself to someone else.” —Rose Pere

Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D. is an internationally renowned expert in the fields of stress management, mind-body-spirit healing and stress and human spirituality. He is the author of over 10 books including the bestsellers, Stand Like Mountain, Flow Like Water, Stressed Is Desserts Spelled Backward, The Art of Calm, Quiet Mind, Fearless Heart and Managing Stress (6E). He can be reached through his website:www.brianlukeseaward.net
© Brian Luke Seaward, PhD.

A Change Would Do You Good!

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There is a light bulb joke that goes like this: How many psychologists does it take to change a light bulb? Answer: One… but the light bulb has REALLY got to want to change. Changing behaviors isn’t easy (if it were dieting/obesity, exercise, alcoholism and quitting smoking would not be major health issues that they are today.) Changing health behaviors requires more than will power. It requires the combined forces of both the conscious and unconscious minds. Many people forget that about 85% (if not more) of human behavior is governed by the unconscious. It is a formidable force to reckon with and one that is often neglected in changing stress-prone behaviors. Sadly, the advertising industry is well aware of the powers of the unconscious mind and uses this knowledge daily. So much so they can get you to buy things you don’t need with money you don’t have. This is also why hypnotherapy is thought to be effective for a great many people. The unconscious mind, Carl Jung, taught us speaks in a whole different language than words. Its language palette includes the use of symbols, colors, metaphors, intuition, stories, dreams, and sometimes music (not to mention the occasional Freudian slip). So… if you are looking to make some positive changes in your (stress-prone) behaviors, unite the powers of both minds: your conscious and unconscious minds.

• Stress Tip for the Day:
Intuition isn’t an inner resource just for stay at home moms and Jamaican psychics, we all have the ability to tap into the power of our unconscious mind and access the deep-seated wisdom of our intuition. Intuition is not a fear-based voice. The voice of intuition is a message grounded in stability—once you have quieted the voice of the ego. Take time to listen to your intuition. Take time to unite the powers of both minds.

• Links Worth Noting:
My friend Michele Mariscal (hi Michele) sent me this link which often has some great photos of the night sky (and most likely paid for by your tax dollars). Enjoy
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/

• Photo of the Day:
While it was tempting to use a photo of a light bulb, I thought better of the idea (my intuition thought better—wink). Lately we have been having some AMAZING thunderstorms here in Colorado. It’s not easy to photograph bolts of lightening and I have been trying in vain to get “the best shot and film footage” for my Earth Songs DVD. I think I succeeded the other night while photographing a sunset from my back yard. The mountains in the background are part of the Rocky Mountain National Park. The lightening show went on four hours after sunset. Enjoy
!
• Quote for the Day:
“I’m not offended by the term “dumb blonde, because I’m not dumb and I’m not blonde.”
—Dolly Parton

Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D. is an internationally renowned expert in the fields of stress management, mind-body-spirit healing and stress and human spirituality. He is the author of over 10 books including the bestsellers, Stand Like Mountain, Flow Like Water, Stressed Is Desserts Spelled Backward, The Art of Calm, Quiet Mind, Fearless Heart and Managing Stress (6E). He can be reached through his website:www.brianlukeseaward.net

© Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D.

Man’s Best Friends Indeed!

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Research studies show that people who own pets (primarily cats and dogs) are less stressed than non-pet owners. Specifically, they have lower resting heart rate and blood pressure measurements than those who don’t. Interestingly, people who own pets are also noted to have shorter hospital stays when ill. What makes owning a pet so healthy? Speculation suggests that it is the ability to bond with something that loves you back. The operative word is LOVE! Experts in the field of health psychology note that the expression of (unconditional) love to pets has a healing quality all its own. They also note that as the world becomes more high tech and friendships become more virtual, there is less and less actual contact with human to human species. Even less contact in the way of the expressions of love (patience, forgiveness, optimism, etc.) While not all house pets bond as closely as we might hope, scientist Rupert Sheldrake was enthralled with the idea of house pets who waited by the door for their owners to return. It was discovered that some pets know the exact moment their owners head for home (regardless of the distance) suggesting some energetic connection between animal and human (Sheldrake calls this the morphogenic energy field). Medical intuitives also share a common insight that some pets have been known to take on their owner’s disease (mostly cancer) as an act of unconditional love. It all comes down to LOVE! Those of you who own pets know all of this already. Those of you who are not pet owners… perhaps its time to include a furry friend to the family?

• Stress Tip for the Day:
With all the housing foreclosures going on these days what doesn’t make the news is that many pets are being left IN the houses once the people leave for good (one can only assume that under such stress, they are not thinking clearly!) Many pet rescue outfits are swamped with the breed of animal they rescue and can use some help to find homes. It might be worth checking out. While owning a pet has its share of responsibilities, the stress-resilient benefits are well worth it. Consider adding pet therapy to your repetoire of relaxation therapies!

• Books Worth Noting:
I would be quite remiss if I didn’t mention the book, Marley & Me in this slot. When my first dog, Shasta, died, I think I ended up with about 15 copies of this book (as gifts from all over the country). The movie was good, the book is much better.

• Photo of the Day:
My new dog, Logan (whom I named after a college buddy), is a three-year old Siberian husky whom I rescued several months ago (thanks Ingrid at Polaris Husky Rescue). It didn’t take long for us to bond and now he is my proverbial shadow. He’s all done shedding his winter coat (for huskies … it’s called a “blowout” and boy did they get that name right!) I am considering making a sweater (perhaps several) out of his blowout next year. Logan tells me he, like my first dog, Shasta, wants to appear on the back cover of a new book. Fingers and paws crossed on that one buddy. Logan will be making a guest appearance as pet therapist in training at the Vail Mountain Retreat in Oct (call for details).

• Quote for the Day:
“Dog spelled backward is still man’s best friend.”
—Anonymous

Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D. is an internationally renowned expert in the fields of stress management, mind-body-spirit healing and stress and human spirituality. He is the author of over 10 books including the bestsellers, Stand Like Mountain, Flow Like Water, Stressed Is Desserts Spelled Backward, The Art of Calm, Quiet Mind, Fearless Heart and Managing Stress (6E). He can be reached through his website:www.brianlukeseaward.net

© Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D.

Purpose and Meaing in Life

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A statistic made the news several years ago and every now and then surfaces again in the media (I first heard of this insight from my friend, colleague and mentor, Larry Dossey, M.D.). More people suffer (and die) of heart attacks in the US on Monday morning between the hours and 8-10 than any other time during the week. When those who survived the heart attack were questioned, it was learned that many people expressed how much they didn’t like their jobs. Further exploration revealed that these people admitted to a lack of purpose in meaning in their lives (most likely as a result of not liking their jobs). Wisdom keepers the world over will tell you that a meaningful purpose in life is the corner stone to human spirituality. A strong purpose in life contributes to the health of one’s human spirit. A lack of purpose will quickly affect mind, body and spirit. Psychologists and therapists (if they are honest) will tell you that a lack of purpose in meaning in one’s life is a colossal stressor in one’s life. Not having a significant meaning in life lays the foundation for strife and perhaps ultimately depression for a great many people: The empty nest syndrome, Olympic blues, the midlife crisis, retirement blues and now even the recession blues are some examples of this scenario, but I have also seen it in college students as well. Finding a purpose in life isn’t an overnight sensation and it is fair to say that we will have many purposes in the course of our life.

• Stress Tip for the Day:
What gets you out of bed each morning and encourages you to embrace the world with enthusiasm? If you can answer this question, consider picking up the book, Man’s Search for Meaning by Victor Frankl and give it a quick read (even if you have already read it before). This book was required reading as one of my graduate courses in health psychology and ever since reading I recommend it to everyone. I think it should be required reading for the world (and I am not alone).

• Links Worth Noting:
The documentary film, The Cove, won great praise at the Sundance Film Festival this year. It explores the Japanese killing of whales. Rolling Stone magazine describes this movie as the Borne Identity meets flipper. Here are a few links from the trailer to reviews. Knowledge is power.

http://thecovemovie.com/

http://thecovemovie.com/_blog/Reviews

http://thecovemovie.com/the_cove/synopsis.htm

http://thecovemovie.com/the_team/the-team.htm

http://www.apple.com/trailers/independent/thecove

• Photo of the Day:
While in Sitka, Alaska last week I was priviledged to have walked/hiked through an old growth cathedral forest of thousands of Sitka Spruce, some of which were over 800 years old. It is a very humbling experience to walk through a forest of trees that stand guard over the planet. I always wanted to photograph trees looking up to capture the magnitude of the experience. Here is my best effort. Enjoy.

• Quote for the Day: “There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as if everything is.”
— Albert Einstein

Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D. is an internationally renowned expert in the fields of stress management, mind-body-spirit healing and stress and human spirituality. He is the author of over 10 books including the bestsellers, Stand Like Mountain, Flow Like Water, Stressed Is Desserts Spelled Backward, The Art of Calm, Quiet Mind, Fearless Heart and Managing Stress (6E). He can be reached through his website:www.brianlukeseaward.net

© Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D.

Let Food Be Your Medicine

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Emotional stress may be a HUGE problem in the world today, but we should not forget about other stressors that also effect our health, many of which we have some control over, such as the quality of foods we consume! It’s no secret that America has the greatest choice of foods to eat in the world! It’s also no secret (but it’s not that well known) that America has some of the poorest “quality” foods in the world. In an effort to promote shelf life and appeal to the shopper’s eye (e.g. profits), foods today are processed less for health than for corporate interests. Today our foods are laden with synthetic chemicals (e.g., herbicides, fungicides, pesticides and fertilizers, many of which are made from petro-chemicals) that are not only not natural, they are not healthy for human consumption (FYI: there is thought to be a HUGE connection between these chemicals and the increased rates of cancer and other chronic diseases in the past 40 years). Add to the mix the onslaught of hormones and antibiotics that are pumped into our meats and what we have, in a word, is STRESS, to the body. As these chemicals linger in the body (mostly in fat tissue) they tend to cause all kinds of problems with proper cell metabolism. Hippocrates, Greek luminary and the father of modern medicine, is credited as saying: “Let food be your medicine and let medicine be your food.” This is a great rule to live by! Organic food is the path of least resistance when it comes to a low stress diet. And… as I always tell my college students, “Eat at least one meal a day for your immune system.” Knowledge is power and its time to become knowledge about the foods you eat!

• Stress Tip for the Day:
The World Health Organization recommends about 40 grams of fiber per day. Estimates suggest that the average American eats about 8 grams per day. AND … there is not a lot of fiber in iceberg lettuce! The summer season is a great time to eat a balance of fruits and veggies that not only contain essential vitamins and minerals but also non-digestible fiber that, in essence, cleans out your GI track reducing the risk of colon cancer. When possible, please consider eating organic foods.

• Links Worth Noting:
There are many websites that address many topics of nutrition. Here are a few of my favorites:

http://www.drweil.com/u/Home/index.html

http://healthletter.tufts.edu/

http://nutrition.about.com/

http://www.organicconnection.net/nutritional.html

http://www.omega-3info.com/faqs.htm#4

• Photo of the Day:
A colorful photo of fresh broccoli. FYI… when cooking vegetables like broccoli, its always best to steam them, as plopping them in water results in the essential water soluble vitamins and minerals being leached into the water, which often get thrown down the drain.

• Quote for the Day:
“Chemicals have replaced bacteria and viruses as the main threat to human health. The diseases we’re beginning to see as the major causes of death as we begin the 21st century are diseases of chemical origin.” —Rick Irvin, Toxicologist, Texas A&M University

Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D. is an internationally renowned expert in the fields of stress management, mind-body-spirit healing and stress and human spirituality. He is the author of over 10 books including the bestsellers, Stand Like Mountain, Flow Like Water, Stressed Is Desserts Spelled Backward, The Art of Calm, Quiet Mind, Fearless Heart and Managing Stress (6E). He can be reached through his website:www.brianlukeseaward.net

© Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D.

Stress and Bodywork

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The number one symptom of stress is muscle tension. Muscle tension doesn’t put people in the hospital (what does tends to be problems with the GI tract since it is so heavily innervated with nerves—resulting in problems ranging from IBS to Crones Disease and many more). Over time tense muscles will effect everything from posture to hip placement causing severe chronic pain. As Ben Franklin once said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” In this case, an ounce is a massage. What was once considered to be a luxury for the rich is now a necessity for the common citizen. Regardless of how great your workstation ergonomics are, bodywork in the form of massage, Rolfing, Myofascial Release, Shiatsu or scores of other bodywork modalities should be a requirement for reducing one’s stress levels and ultimately one’s optimal health. Working out the knots in the neck, shoulder and back muscles is a godsend and great prevention for musculo-skeletal problems down the road.

• Stress Tip for the Day:
While preparing for the Hood To Coast relay race last year, I arranged for our entire team to get a sports massage. I was a bit surprised to realize how many guys on our team had NEVER had a massage. Typically the cost of a massage is about $60/hour give or take some depending on your locale. If you have never had a massage, now’s the time, and if you haven’t had a massage in a long time, now’s the time as well. What kind of massage is best? That depends. Some people like deep tissue, others want a gentle massage. Some people want a full body massage (90 minutes) rather than the 60 min sessions. You decide. How do you find a good massage therapist. The same way you would find a dentist or optometrist—Ask your friends or colleagues, get several recommendations… do some homework! And… if you like, bring your own relaxing music for your massage.

• Links Worth Noting:
A new movie is release today called Food, Inc. and I have placed a link to the trailer below. Having taught nutrition for over 10 years at the University of Colorado I can tell you that this movie should be required by everyone in the country. Knowledge is power. Time to empower yourself.
In tandem with this movie I would like to recommend a new book that has just come out called, THE END OF FOOD by Paul Roberts. Both of these offer a sobering look at our (pathetic) food industry.

• Photo of the Day:
As a board member for my local hospital, I asked the Complementary Medicine Staff if I could do a photo shoot for an upcoming presentation. Many thanks to the staff who were so cooperative.

• Quote for the Day: “ I cannot and should not be cured of my stress, but merely taught to enjoy it.”
— Hans Selye, M.D.

Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D. is an internationally renowned expert in the fields of stress management, mind-body-spirit healing and stress and human spirituality. He is the author of over 10 books including the bestsellers, Stand Like Mountain, Flow Like Water, Stressed Is Desserts Spelled Backward, The Art of Calm, Quiet Mind, Fearless Heart and Managing Stress (6E). He can be reached through his website:www.brianlukeseaward.net

© Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D.

Stress and Altruism

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Moments of stress can prove to be pretty selfish because the ego directs all attention toward the self and then often magnifies things out of proportion. As bad as we might have it, there is always someone who has it worse. This brings to mind the anonymous quote: “I felt sorry for myself because I had no shoes until I met a man who had no feet.” Walking down the street one day with a friend, we saw a man begging for money on the sidewalk. Katy didn’t hesitate to open her purse, pull out a dollar bill and proceed to give it to the man—with a smile. Knowing Katy’s financial situation I was a bit surprised by her actions. Walking away Katy shared with me that when you engage in a random act of kindness you make the world a better place, no matter how small the effort. Not only does the stranger benefit by your generosity, the giver benefits as well. Opening your heart in times of stress is one of the greatest coping techniques there is. Altruism might be best described as a selfless act of generosity, where nothing in return is expected, but when love is shared, everyone benefits. In times of stress, when love is shared it also puts our problems in proportion to the bigger picture of life.

• Stress Tip for the Day:
A random act of kindness needn’t involve a monetary transaction. It could be a genuine smile to the supermarket cashier, forgoing the parking space closest to the front door of a store or opening the door for somebody. In helping others in a humble gesture we make the world a better place (and these days the world needs it). So take a moment in the course of today to share a random act of kindness. You will see that what goes around comes around. Also… do a Google search for the Desisterada poem and read it before you go to be tonight.

• Links Worth Noting:
As Congress and the President work this week on an energy bill to less the green house emissions, I came across this link regarding electric cars. Some are calling this the sequel to the documentary: Who Killed the Electric Car. Enjoy.
http://revengeoftheelectriccar.com/

• Photo of the Day:
While in Iceland last year, I stopped at a place on the infamous Ring Road where a mountain glacier meets the Atlantic Ocean. Iceland is a beautiful country and I HIGHLY recommend a trip there if you get the chance. This photo reminds me that being in nature often puts our problems in proportion to the bigger picture of life.

• Quote for the Day:
“The ultimate purpose in life is to shed light on the mere purpose of being.”
—Carl G. Jung

Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D. is an internationally renowned expert in the fields of stress management, mind-body-spirit healing and stress and human spirituality. He is the author of over 10 books including the bestsellers, Stand Like Mountain, Flow Like Water, Stressed Is Desserts Spelled Backward, The Art of Calm, Quiet Mind, Fearless Heart and Managing Stress (6E). He can be reached through his website:www.brianlukeseaward.net

© Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D.

Spoiled Brats & Healthy Boundaries With Grief

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We have it really good in this country, but to listen to people talk you might never know it. To be honest, we are a bunch of spoiled brats (also known as the “Entitlement Generation!”)With all the complaining and whining going on, you might think that something or someone really important died. During a period of loss, grieving is a part of the human journey and one should not deny themselves this experience. To grieve is not only normal, it’s healthy! Healthy grieving is cathartic (and emotional release yet everything has limits). Textbook examples of grieving included crying, silence, even brief periods of depression. But there are other signs, far more noticeable today that have become a part of everyday living and these are neither normal nor healthy. I call this stress-prone behavior the “BMW syndrome” and it stands for bitch, moan and whine! It has reached epidemic proportions. If you take time to listen to people’s conversations today you might notice that there is a LOT of grieving going on. Remember… it’s OK to grieve, but not all the time. Prolonged grieving as a form of stress, is not considered healthy. It only attracts more stress.

• Stress Tip for the Day:
Eavesdrop on your own conversations this week and listen to how often you express your thoughts as a “grieving process.” If it seems you are spending a lot of time doing BMW syndrome put a healthy boundary on your grieving and move on. You can move on by beginning to appreciate all the things going on RIGHT in your life.

• Links Worth Noting:
Daniel Goleman (author of*Emotional Intelligence*) has written a new book called, *Ecological Intelligence* (for more info, see http://www.morethansound.net/ecological-intelligence.php). Goleman talked about a website called the “Good Guide” (http://www.goodguide.com/) that “strives to provide the world’s largest and most reliable source of information on the health, environmental, and social impacts of products and companies. GoodGuide’s mission is to help you find safe, healthy, and green products that are better for you and the planet.

• Photo of the Day:
I just returned from a trip to Sitka, AK (sorry for the absense of blog entries this past week) where I presented several workshops on stress management (including a premier of Earth Songs) to various groups in this beautiful town. Here is one of several photos to share from my time there (and I highly recommend a visit to Sitka. It’s breathtaking!

• Quote for the Day:
“You don’t have a soul! You are a soul. You have a body!”
—Anonymous

Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D. is an internationally renowned expert in the fields of stress management, mind-body-spirit healing and stress and human spirituality. He is the author of over 10 books including the bestsellers, Stand Like Mountain, Flow Like Water, Stressed Is Desserts Spelled Backward, The Art of Calm, Quiet Mind, Fearless Heart and Managing Stress (6E). He can be reached through his website:www.brianlukeseaward.net

© Brian Luke Seaward, Ph.D.